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UK Government’s citizenship-stripping plans defeated by Lords

UK Government’s citizenship-stripping plans defeated by Lords

 

Government plans which would allow ministers to strip Britons of their citizenship without due process – even where doing so would make them stateless – were tonight defeated in the House of Lords.

The measures, contained in clause 64 of the Immigration Bill, would have allowed the Home Secretary to deprive any naturalised Britons – i.e. any of the estimated 3-4 million not born in the country – of their citizenship, without having to first go through any legal process.  It would also enable her to do so even if it would leave the person concerned without any nationality.

The measure, which had been brought forward by Theresa May at the last minute of the Bill’s progress through the Commons, was tonight removed from the Bill in favour of an amendment which requires it to be further considered by a joint committee of the Commons and Lords.  The amendment was backed by a former Supreme Court Judge, Lord Brown, former Director of Public Prosecutions, Lord Macdonald, leading QC Lord Pannick and Labour front-bencher Baroness Smith.  It passed by 242 votes to 180.

In a previous debate, Lord Macdonald had warned that the Home Secretary’s proposal “associates the United Kingdom with a policy beloved of the world’s worst regimes during the 20th century.”

Commenting, Clare Algar, Executive Director of legal charity Reprieve said: “It is good news that these dangerous proposals have been staved off – for now at least.  Making people stateless in this way was rightly described by the US Supreme Court 50 years ago as a ‘punishment more primitive than torture.’  It is staggering that Theresa May thought it one that should be imposed on British citizens, without even so much as a trial.

“We have already seen examples in the past where those who have lost their British citizenship have subsequently been ‘rendered’ or killed by drone strikes.  There is a real concern that these plans are part of the UK’s contribution to the ill-conceived ‘War on Terror.’”

ENDS

The full text of the amendment – number 56 – can be found here: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/bills/lbill/2013-2014/0096/amend/ml096-III.htm

Lord Macdonald’s comments were made in the House of Lords on 17 March:http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201314/ldhansrd/text/140317-0002.htm

The Immigration Rules Part 9 Grounds for Refusal of Entry Clearance

The Immigration Rules Part 9 Grounds for Refusal of Entry Clearance 

 

Immigration Rules

Part 9

 

General grounds for the refusal of entry clearance, leave to enter or variation of leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom
This is a consolidated version of the current Immigration Rules as at today’s date.

Refusal of entry clearance or leave to enter the United Kingdom

A320. Paragraphs 320 (except subparagraph (3), (10) and (11)) and 322 do not apply to an application for entry clearance, leave to enter or leave to remain as a Family Member under Appendix FM, and Part 9 (except for paragraph 322(1)) does not apply to an application for leave to remain on the grounds of private life under paragraphs 276ADE-276DH.

B320(1). Subject to sub-paragraph (2), paragraphs 320 (except sub-paragraphs (3), (7B),(10) and (11)) and 322 (except sub-paragraphs (2) and (3)) do not apply to an application for entry clearance, leave to enter or leave to remain under Appendix Armed Forces.
(2) As well as the sub-paragraphs mentioned above, sub-paragraph (13) of paragraph 320 also applies to applications for entry clearance, leave to enter or leave to remain under Part 9 or 10 of Appendix Armed Forces.

320. In addition to the grounds of refusal of entry clearance or leave to enter set out in Parts 2-8 of these Rules, and subject to paragraph 321 below, the following grounds for the refusal of entry clearance or leave to enter apply:

Grounds on which entry clearance or leave to enter the United Kingdom is to be refused

(1) the fact that entry is being sought for a purpose not covered by these Rules;

(2) the fact that the person seeking entry to the United Kingdom:
(a) is currently the subject of a deportation order; or
(b) has been convicted of an offence for which they have been sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 4 years; or
(c) has been convicted of an offence for which they have been sentenced to a period of imprisonment of at least 12 months but less than 4 years, unless a period of 10 years has passed since the end of the sentence; or
(d) has been convicted of an offence for which they have been sentenced to a period of imprisonment of less than 12 months, unless a period of 5 years has passed since the end of the sentence.

Where this paragraph applies, unless refusal would be contrary to the Human Rights Convention or the Convention and Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, it will only be in exceptional circumstances that the public interest in maintaining refusal will be outweighed by compelling factors.

(3) failure by the person seeking entry to the United Kingdom to produce to the Immigration Officer a valid national passport or other document satisfactorily establishing his identity and nationality;

(4) failure to satisfy the Immigration Officer, in the case of a person arriving in the United Kingdom or seeking entry through the Channel Tunnel with the intention of entering any other part of the common travel area, that he is acceptable to the immigration authorities there;

(5) failure, in the case of a visa national, to produce to the Immigration Officer a passport or other identity document endorsed with a valid and current United Kingdom entry clearance issued for the purpose for which entry is sought;

(6) where the Secretary of State has personally directed that the exclusion of a person from the United Kingdom is conducive to the public good;

(7) save in relation to a person settled in the United Kingdom or where the Immigration Officer is satisfied that there are strong compassionate reasons justifying admission, confirmation from the Medical Inspector that, for medical reasons, it is undesirable to admit a person seeking leave to enter the United Kingdom.

(7A) where false representations have been made or false documents or information have been submitted (whether or not material to the application, and whether or not to the applicant’s knowledge), or material facts have not been disclosed, in relation to the application or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party required in support of the application.

(7B) where the applicant has previously breached the UK’s immigration laws (and was 18 or over at the time of his most recent breach)by:
(a) Overstaying;
(b) breaching a condition attached to his leave;
(c) being an Illegal Entrant;
(d) using Deception in an application for entry clearance, leave to enter or remain, or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party required in support of the application (whether successful or not);
unless the applicant:
(i) Overstayed for 90 days or less and left the UK voluntarily, not at the expense (directly or indirectly) of the Secretary of State;
(ii) used Deception in an application for entry clearance more than 10 years ago;
(iii) left the UK voluntarily, not at the expense (directly or indirectly) of the Secretary of State, more than 12 months ago;
(iv) left the UK voluntarily, at the expense (directly or indirectly) of the Secretary of State, more than 2 years ago; and the date the person left the UK was no more than 6 months after the date on which the person was given notice of the removal decision, or no more than 6 months after the date on which the person no longer had a pending appeal; whichever is the later;
(v) left the UK voluntarily, at the expense (directly or indirectly) of the Secretary of State, more than 5 years ago;
(vi) was removed or deported from the UK more than 10 years ago or;

(vii) left or was removed from the UK as a condition of a caution issued in accordance with section 22 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 more than 5 years ago.
Where more than one breach of the UK’s immigration laws has occurred, only the breach which leads to the longest period of absence from the UK will be relevant under this paragraph.

(7D) failure, without providing a reasonable explanation, to comply with a request made on behalf of the Entry Clearance Officer to attend for interview.
Grounds on which entry clearance or leave to enter the United Kingdom should normally be refused

(8) failure by a person arriving in the United Kingdom to furnish the Immigration Officer with such information as may be required for the purpose of deciding whether he requires leave to enter and, if so, whether and on what terms leave should be given;

(8A) where the person seeking leave is outside the United Kingdom, failure by him to supply any information, documents, copy documents or medical report requested by an Immigration Officer;

(9) failure by a person seeking leave to enter as a returning resident to satisfy the Immigration Officer that he meets the requirements of paragraph 18 of these Rules, or that he seeks leave to enter for the same purpose as that for which his earlier leave was granted;

(10) production by the person seeking leave to enter the United Kingdom of a national passport or travel document issued by a territorial entity or authority which is not recognised by Her Majesty’s Government as a state or is not dealt with as a government by them, or which does not accept valid United Kingdom passports for the purpose of its own immigration control; or a passport or travel document which does not comply with international passport practice;

(11) where the applicant has previously contrived in a significant way to frustrate the intentions of the Rules by:
(i) overstaying; or
(ii) breaching a condition attached to his leave; or
(iii) being an illegal entrant; or
(iv) using deception in an application for entry clearance, leave to enter or remain or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party required in support of the application (whether successful or not); and
there are other aggravating circumstances, such as absconding, not meeting temporary admission/reporting restrictions or bail conditions, using an assumed identity or multiple identities, switching nationality, making frivolous applications or not complying with the re-documentation process.

(12) DELETED

(13) failure, except by a person eligible for admission to the United Kingdom for settlement, to satisfy the Immigration Officer that he will be admitted to another country after a stay in the United Kingdom;

(14) refusal by a sponsor of a person seeking leave to enter the United Kingdom to give, if requested to do so, an undertaking in writing to be responsible for that person’s maintenance and accommodation for the period of any leave granted;

(16) failure, in the case of a child under the age of 18 years seeking leave to enter the United Kingdom otherwise than in conjunction with an application made by his parent(s) or legal guardian to provide the Immigration Officer, if required to do so, with written consent to the application from his parent(s) or legal guardian; save that the requirement as to written consent does not apply in the case of a child seeking admission to the United Kingdom as an asylum seeker;

(17) save in relation to a person settled in the United Kingdom, refusal to undergo a medical examination when required to do so by the Immigration Officer;

(18) DELETED

(18A) within the 12 months prior to the date on which the application is decided, the person has been convicted of or admitted an offence for which they received a non-custodial sentence or other out of court disposal that is recorded on their criminal record;

(18B) in the view of the Secretary of State:
(a) the person’s offending has caused serious harm; or
(b) the person is a persistent offender who shows a particular disregard for the law.

(19) The immigration officer deems the exclusion of the person from the United Kingdom to be conducive to the public good. For example, because the person’s conduct (including convictions which do not fall within paragraph 320(2)), character, associations, or other reasons, make it undesirable to grant them leave to enter.

(20) failure by a person seeking entry into the United Kingdom to comply with a requirement relating to the provision of physical data to which he is subject by regulations made under section 126 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.

(21) DELETED

(22) where one or more relevant NHS body has notified the Secretary of State that the person seeking entry or leave to enter has failed to pay a charge or charges with a total value of at least £1000 in accordance with the relevant NHS regulations on charges to overseas visitors.
Refusal of leave to enter in relation to a person in possession of an entry clearance

321. A person seeking leave to enter the United Kingdom who holds an entry clearance which was duly issued to him and is still current may be refused leave to enter only where the Immigration Officer is satisfied that:
(i) False representations were made or false documents or information were submitted (whether or not material to the application, and whether or not to the holder’s knowledge), or material facts were not disclosed, in relation to the application for entry clearance; or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party required in support of the application.
(ii) a change of circumstances since it was issued has removed the basis of the holder’s claim to admission, except where the change of circumstances amounts solely to the person becoming over age for entry in one of the categories contained in paragraphs 296-316 of these Rules since the issue of the entry clearance; or
(iii) on grounds which would have led to a refusal under paragraphs 320(2), 320(6), 320(18A), 320(18B) or 320(19) (except where this sub-paragraph applies in respect of an entry clearance issued under Appendix Armed Forces it is to be read as if for “paragraphs 320(2), 320(6), 320(18A), 320(18B) or 320(19)” it said “paragraph 8(a), (b), (c) or (g) and paragraph 9(d)”)
Grounds on which leave to enter or remain which is in force is to be cancelled at port or while the holder is outside the United Kingdom

321A. The following grounds for the cancellation of a person’s leave to enter or remain which is in force on his arrival in, or whilst he is outside, the United Kingdom apply;
(1) there has been such a change in the circumstances of that person’s case since the leave was given, that it should be cancelled; or
(2) false representations were made or false documents were submitted (whether or not material to the application, and whether or not to the holder’s knowledge), or material facts were not disclosed, in relation to the application for leave; or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party required in support of the application or,
(3) save in relation to a person settled in the United Kingdom or where the Immigration Officer or the Secretary of State is satisfied that there are strong compassionate reasons justifying admission, where it is apparent that, for medical reasons, it is undesirable to admit that person to the United Kingdom; or
(4) where the Secretary of State has personally directed that the exclusion of that person from the United Kingdom is conducive to the public good; or
(4A) Grounds which would have led to a refusal under paragraphs 320(2), 320(6), 320(18A), 320(18B) or 320(19) if the person concerned were making a new application for leave to enter or remain (except where this sub-paragraph applies in respect of leave to enter or remain granted under Appendix Armed Forces it is to be read as if for paragraphs 320(2), 320(6), 320(18A), 320(18B) or 320(19)” it said “paragraph 8(a), (b), (c) or (g) and paragraph 9(d)”); or
(5) The Immigration Officer or the Secretary of State deems the exclusion of the person from the United Kingdom to be conducive to the public good. For example, because the person’s conduct (including convictions which do not fall within paragraph 320(2)), character, associations, or other reasons, make it undesirable to grant them leave to enter the United Kingdom; or
(6) where that person is outside the United Kingdom, failure by that person to supply any information, documents, copy documents or medical report requested by an Immigration Officer or the Secretary of State.

Refusal of leave to remain, variation of leave to enter or remain or curtailment of leave

322. In addition to the grounds for refusal of extension of stay set out in Parts 2-8 of these Rules, the following provisions apply in relation to the refusal of an application for leave to remain, variation of leave to enter or remain or, where appropriate, the curtailment of leave:

Grounds on which leave to remain and variation of leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom are to be refused
(1) the fact that variation of leave to enter or remain is being sought for a purpose not covered by these Rules.

(1A) where false representations have been made or false documents or information have been submitted (whether or not material to the application, and whether or not to the applicant’s knowledge), or material facts have not been disclosed, in relation to the application or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party required in support of the application.

(1B) the applicant is, at the date of application, the subject of a deportation order or a decision to make a deportation order; (1C) where the person is seeking indefinite leave to enter or remain:
(i) they have been convicted of an offence for which they have been sentenced to imprisonment for at least 4 years; or
(ii) they have been convicted of an offence for which they have been sentenced to imprisonment for at least 12 months but less than 4 years, unless a period of 15 years has passed since the end of the sentence; or
(iii) they have been convicted of an offence for which they have been sentenced to imprisonment for less than 12 months, unless a period of 7 years has passed since the end of the sentence; or
(iv) they have, within the 24 months prior to the date on which the application is decided, been convicted of or admitted an offence for which they have received a non-custodial sentence or other out of court disposal that is recorded on their criminal record.

(1D) DELETED.

Grounds on which leave to remain and variation of leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom should normally be refused

(2) the making of false representations or the failure to disclose any material fact for the purpose of obtaining leave to enter or a previous variation of leave or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party required in support of the application for leave to enter or a previous variation of leave.

(2A) the making of false representations or the failure to disclose any material fact for the purpose of obtaining a document from the Secretary of State that indicates the person has a right to reside in the United Kingdom.

(3) failure to comply with any conditions attached to the grant of leave to enter or remain;

(4) failure by the person concerned to maintain or accommodate himself and any dependants without recourse to public funds;

(5) the undesirability of permitting the person concerned to remain in the United Kingdom in the light of his conduct (including convictions which do not fall within paragraph 322(1C), character or associations or the fact that he represents a threat to national security;

(5A) it is undesirable to permit the person concerned to enter or remain in the United Kingdom because, in the view of the Secretary of State:
(a) their offending has caused serious harm; or
(b) they are a persistent offender who shows a particular disregard for the law;

(6) refusal by a sponsor of the person concerned to give, if requested to do so, an undertaking in writing to be responsible for his maintenance and accommodation in the United Kingdom or failure to honour such an undertaking once given;

(7) failure by the person concerned to honour any declaration or undertaking given orally or in writing as to the intended duration and/or purpose of his stay;

(8) failure, except by a person who qualifies for settlement in the United Kingdom or by the spouse or civil partner of a person settled in the United Kingdom, to satisfy the Secretary of State that he will be returnable to another country if allowed to remain in the United Kingdom for a further period;

(9) failure by an applicant to produce within a reasonable time information, documents or other evidence required by the Secretary of State to establish his claim to remain under these Rules;

(10) failure, without providing a reasonable explanation, to comply with a request made on behalf of the Secretary of State to attend for interview;

(11) failure, in the case of a child under the age of 18 years seeking a variation of his leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom otherwise than in conjunction with an application by his parent(s) or legal guardian, to provide the Secretary of State, if required to do so, with written consent to the application from his parent(s) or legal guardian; save that the requirement as to written consent does not apply in the case of a child who has been admitted to the United Kingdom as an asylum seeker.

(12) where one or more relevant NHS body has notified the Secretary of State that the person seeking leave to remain or a variation of leave to enter or remain has failed to pay a charge or charges with a total value of at least £1000 in accordance with the relevant NHS regulations on charges to overseas visitors.

Grounds on which leave to enter or remain may be curtailed

323. A person’s leave to enter or remain may be curtailed:
(i) on any of the grounds set out in paragraph 322(2)-(5A) above (except where this paragraph applies in respect of a person granted leave under Appendix

Armed Forces “paragraph 322(2)-(5A) above” is to read as if it said “paragraph 322(2) and (3) above and paragraph 8(e) and (g) of Appendix Armed Forces”; or
(ii) if he ceases to meet the requirements of the Rules under which his leave to enter or remain was granted; or
(iii) if he is the dependant, or is seeking leave to remain as the dependant, of an asylum applicant whose claim has been refused and whose leave has been curtailed under section 7 of the1993 Act, and he does not qualify for leave to remain in his own right, or
(iv) on any of the grounds set out in paragraph 339A (i)-(vi) and paragraph 339G (i)-(vi), or
(v) where a person has, within the first 6 months of being granted leave to enter, committed an offence for which they are subsequently sentenced to a period of imprisonment, or
(vi) he was granted his current period of leave as the dependent of a person (“P”) and P’s leave to enter or remain is being, or has been, curtailed.
Curtailment of leave in relation to a Tier 2 Migrant, a Tier 5 Migrant or a Tier 4 Migrant
323A. In addition to the grounds specified in paragraph 323, the leave to enter or remain of a Tier 2 Migrant, a Tier 4 Migrant or a Tier 5 Migrant:
(a) is to be curtailed, or its duration varied, if:
(i) in the case of a Tier 2 Migrant or a Tier 5 Migrant:
(1) the migrant fails to commence, or
(2) the migrant ceases, or will cease, before the end date recorded on the Certificate of Sponsorship Checking Service,
the employment, volunteering, training or job shadowing (as the case may be) that the migrant has been sponsored to do.
(ii) in the case of a Tier 4 Migrant:
(1) the migrant fails to commence studying with the Sponsor, or
(2) the Sponsor has excluded or withdrawn the migrant, or the migrant has withdrawn, from the course of studies, or
(2A) the migrant’s course of study has ceased, or will cease, before the end date recorded on the Certificate of Sponsorship Checking Service, or
(3) the Sponsor withdraws their sponsorship of a migrant on the doctorate extension scheme, or
(4) the Sponsor withdraws their sponsorship of a migrant who, having completed a pre-sessional course as provided in paragraph 120(b) (i) of

Appendix A, does not have a knowledge of English equivalent to level B2 of the Council of Europe’s Common European Framework for Language Learning in all four components (reading, writing, speaking and listening) or above.
(b) may be curtailed, if:
(i) the migrant’s Sponsor ceases to have a sponsor licence (for whatever reason); or
(ii) the migrant’s Sponsor transfers the business for which the migrant works, or at which the migrant is studying, to another person; and
(1) that person does not have a sponsor licence; and
(2) fails to apply for a sponsor licence within 28 days of the date of the transfer of the business; or
(3) applies for a sponsor licence but is refused; or
(4) makes a successful application for a sponsor licence, but the Sponsor licence granted is not in a category that would allow the Sponsor to issue a Certificate of Sponsorship or Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies to the migrant;
(iii) in the case of a Tier 2 Migrant or a Tier 5 Migrant, if the employment that the Certificate of Sponsorship Checking Service records that the migrant is being sponsored to do undergoes a prohibited change as specified in paragraph 323AA;
(iv) paragraph (a) above applies but:
(1) the migrant is under the age of 18;
(2) the migrant has a dependant child under the age of 18;
(3) leave is to be varied such that when the variation takes effect the migrant will have leave to enter or remain and the migrant has less than 60 days extant leave remaining;
(4) the migrant has been granted leave to enter or remain with another Sponsor or under another immigration category; or
(5) the migrant has a pending application for leave to remain, or variation of leave, with the UK Border Agency, or has a pending appeal under Section 82 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.
323AA Prohibited changes to employment for Tier 2 Migrants and Tier 5 Migrants

The following are prohibited changes, unless a further application for leave to remain is granted which expressly permits the changes:

(a) The migrant is absent from work without pay for one calendar month or more in total (whether over a single period or more than one period), during anycalendar year (1 January to 31 December), unless the absence from work is due solely to:
(i) maternity leave,
(ii) paternity leave,
(iii) adoption leave, or
(iv) long term sick leave of one calendar month or more during any one period.
(b) The employment changes such that the migrant is working for a different employer or Sponsor, unless:
(i) the migrant is a Tier 5 (Temporary Worker) Migrant in the Government Authorised Exchange sub-category and the change of employer is authorised by the Sponsor and under the terms of the work, volunteering or job shadowing that the Certificate of Sponsorship Checking Service records that the migrant is being sponsored to do.
(ii) the migrant is working for a different Sponsor under arrangements covered by the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006 or similar protection to continue in the same job, or
(iii) the migrant is a Tier 2 (Sportsperson) Migrant or a Tier 5 (Temporary Worker) Migrant in the creative and sporting sub-category and the following conditions are met:
(1) The migrant’s sponsor is a sports club;
(2) The migrant is sponsored as a player only and is being temporarily loaned as a player to another sports club;
(3) Player loans are specifically permitted in rules set down by the relevant sports governing body listed in Appendix M;
(4) The migrant’s sponsor has made arrangements with the loan club to enable the sponsor to continue to meet its sponsor duties; and
(5) The migrant will return to working for the sponsor at the end of the loan.
(c) The employment changes to a job in a different Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code to that recorded by the Certificate of Sponsorship Checking Service.
(d) If the migrant is a Tier 2 (Intra-Company Transfer) Migrant or a Tier 2 (General) Migrant, the employment changes to a different job in the same Standard Occupational Classification code to that recorded by the Certificate of Sponsorship Checking Service, and the gross annual salary (including such allowances as are specified as acceptable for this purpose in Appendix A) is below the appropriate salary rate for that new job as specified in the Codes of Practice in Appendix J.
(e) If the migrant was required to be Sponsored for a job at a minimum National Qualification Framework level in the application which led to his last grant of entry clearance or leave to remain, the employment changes to a job which the Codes of Practice in Appendix J record as being at a lower level.
(f) If the migrant is a Tier 2 (General) Migrant and scored points from the shortage occupation provisions of Appendix A, the employment changes to a job which does not appear in the Shortage Occupation List in Appendix K.
(g) Except where (h) applies, the gross annual salary (including such allowances as are specified as acceptable for this purpose in Appendix A) reduces below:
(i) any minimum salary threshold specified in Appendix A of these Rules, where the applicant was subject to or relied on that threshold in the application which led to his current grant of entry clearance or leave to remain, or
(ii) the appropriate salary rate for the job as specified in the Codes of Practice in Appendix J, or
(iii) in cases where there is no applicable threshold in Appendix A and no applicable salary rate in Appendix J, the salary recorded by the Certificate of Sponsorship Checking Service.
(h) Other reductions in salary are permitted if the reduction coincides with a period of:
(i) maternity leave,
(ii) paternity leave,
(iii) adoption leave,
(iv) long term sick leave of one calendar month or more, or
(v) working for the sponsor’s organisation while the migrant is not physically
present in the UK, if the migrant is a Tier 2 (Intra-Company Transfer) Migrant, or
(vi) reduced working hours for a temporary period, where:
(1) the reduced working hours are part of a company-wide policy to avoid redundancies,
(2) under this policy, the Sponsor is not treating the migrant more, or less, favourably than settled workers,
(3) the migrant’s pay and working hours do not reduce by more than 30%,
(4) the reduction in pay is proportionate to the reduction in working hours,
(5) the arrangements will not be in place for more than one year, and
(6) the migrant’s pay will return to at least the level it was before these arrangements were in place, immediately after the arrangements end.

Curtailment of leave in relation to a Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent) Migrant

323B. In addition to the grounds specified in paragraph 323, the leave to enter or remain of a Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent) Migrant may be curtailed if the Designated Competent Body that endorsed the application which led to the migrant’s current grant of leave withdraws its endorsement of the migrant.
Curtailment of leave in relation to a Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur) Migrant

323C. In addition to the grounds specified in paragraph 323, the leave to enter or remain of a Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur) Migrant may be curtailed if the endorsing body that endorsed the application which led to the migrant’s current grant of leave:
(a) loses its status as an endorsing institution for Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur) Migrants,
(b) loses its status as a Highly Trusted Sponsor under Tier 4 of the Points-Based System (for whatever reason),
(c) ceases to be an A-rated Sponsor under Tier 2 or Tier 5 of the Points-Based System because its Tier 2 or Tier 5 Sponsor licence is downgraded or revoked by the UK Border Agency, or
(d) withdraws its endorsement of the migrant.
Crew members

324. A person who has been given leave to enter to join a ship, aircraft, hovercraft, hydrofoil or international train service as a member of its crew, or a crew member who has been given leave to enter for hospital treatment, repatriation or transfer to another ship, aircraft, hovercraft, hydrofoil or international train service in the United Kingdom, is to be refused leave to remain unless an extension of stay is necessary to fulfil the purpose for which he was given leave to enter or unless he meets the requirements for an extension of stay as a spouse or civil partner in paragraph 284.

Bradford man back from aid mission appeals for Syrian Refugees

Bradford man back from aid mission appeals for Syrian Refugees

 

A Bradford father-of-three who has returned from a harrowing aid mission to help Syrian refugees is appealing for more desperately needed help, reports the Bradford Telegraph & Argus

Muqaddus Khan, who is 28, traveled to Jordan with Bradford-based charity Human Relief Foundation to distribute food, water and toys to thousands of people struggling to survive. He said the tragic tales he heard during the mission will stay with him for the rest of his life and have made him even more determined to keep raising funds for the refugees now he is back in his home city.

“Seeing the people who have been affected by the conflict is much different to hearing the stories on the news or the internet. Our staff were so upset to hear some tragic tales. There were stories of children being threatened with knives and guns. One lady had lost her two oldest sons and there was a set of twin baby boys whose father had been killed a month before they were born. Even those who have made it to Jordan are suffering still. Syrian’s are not permitted to work in Jordan, so they rely on charities to feed them and pay their rent. It is terrible for them.”

The Human Relief Foundation has been working with Syrians since the conflict started in March 2011 and has teamed up with the World Food Programme to feed people who have been forced out of their home by conflict in their own country.

So far in Bradford hundreds of young people have taken part in organised events to raise funds for the HRF’s Syria project.

Earlier this month 28 people took part in the Bradford 10k and raised almost £5,000 for the appeal, enough to feed 83 families for one month or one family for six years, said Mr Khan.

The Syria conflict began in 1991 and according to limited statistics available, said Mr Khan, more than 2.5 million people. have been displaced. It is estimated ten per cent of the Syrian population have left the country and 11.8 million people are in urgent need of assistance.

“As entry to the country is difficult and so many areas of Syria are cut off from charitable organisations, statistics are difficult to acquire,” said Mr Khan who works as HRF’s fundraising manager.

To donate to Human Relief Foundation, visit hrf.org.uk or call (01274) 392727

Paragraphs 289A, 289B, 289C and 289D of the Immigration Rules on Domestic Violence

The following is an extract as of today’s date of the Immigration Rules relating to Victims of Domestic Violence in the United Kingdom comprising paragraphs 289A, 289B, 289C and 289D of the Immigration Rules. If you suspect that you are the victim of Domestic Violence and you have concerns relating to your immigration status, call our specialist immigration law team on 020 8401 7352 to discuss your circumstances.

Victims of domestic violence

 

Requirements for indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom as the victim of domestic violence
289A. The requirements to be met by a person who is the victim of domestic violence and who is seeking indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom are that the applicant:

(i) was admitted to the United Kingdom for a period not exceeding 27 months or given an extension of stay for a period of 2 years as the spouse or civil partner of a person present and settled here; or;

(ii) was admitted to the United Kingdom for a period not exceeding 27 months or given an extension of stay for a period of 2 years as the unmarried or same-sex partner of a person present and settled here; and

(iii) the relationship with their spouse or civil partner or unmarried partner or same-sex partner, as appropriate, was subsisting at the beginning of the relevant period of leave or extension of stay referred to in (I) or (ii) above; and

(iv) is able to produce evidence to establish that the relationship was caused to permanently break down before the end of that period as a result of domestic violence; and

(v) DELETED

Indefinite leave to remain as the victim of domestic violence

289B. Indefinite leave to remain as the victim of domestic violence may be granted provided the Secretary of State is satisfied that each of the requirements of paragraph 289A is met.
Refusal of indefinite leave to remain as the victim of domestic violence

289C. Indefinite leave to remain as the victim of domestic violence is to be refused if the Secretary of State is not satisfied that each of the requirements of paragraph 289A is met.

289D. If the applicant does not meet the requirements for indefinite leave to remain as a victim of domestic violence only because paragraph 322(1C)(iii) or 322(1C)(iv) applies, they may be granted further limited leave to remain for a period not exceeding 30 months and subject to such conditions as the Secretary of State deems appropriate.

Private Client Criminal Defence Solicitors

Private Client Criminal Defence Solicitors

When facing criminal proceedings, the last thing you want is delay in your legal team acting in your best interests because of problems and restrictions with Legal Aid. It used to be that Legal Aid would provide full and immediate cover for anyone charged with or suspected of crime. This is no longer the case. With Government cut backs and deep cut restrictions in the Legal Aid budget and levels of cover, many ordinary people with limited incomes are now being refused Legal Aid. It is at times like this when your liberty and reputation are at stake you need professional assistance.

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Call us on 020 8401 7352 or email us at info@solicitorsfirm.com to discuss your requirements with a specialist defence solicitor and obtain a costs estimate

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